Skip to content
SME Home Search Search Results

Displaying 1-10 of 58 results for

Search Filters: 2019 clear Motorized Vehicles clear

Automotive Industry Improves Automation, Adopts Advanced Tech

The U.S. auto industry has been automated for decades. Production of cars and trucks is associated with large, hulking robots fenced off from human employees. Inside those fenced off areas, tasks such as welding are performed. The industry, though, is advancing on the automation front.

Automotive Industry Warms to 3D Printing

The auto industry wants to expand the use of 3D printers. Automakers such as Ford Motor Co. and BMW AG are working directly with additive manufacturers concerning deployment of the technology.

Lightweighting’s New Phase

Earlier this decade, the auto industry moved to lighten cars and trucks. It was supposed to be a competition between steel, long the dominant vehicle material, and aluminum. The latter got a boost when Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, Mich., bet big on aluminum, making aluminum bodies for its F-150 and Super Duty pickups.

Automotive: Cutting the Strong Stuff

If you’ve recently visited planet Earth after being away for several decades, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn how the steel industry, automakers and their suppliers have been working together collaboratively to develop steels that are stronger, lighter and able to meet stringent safety, emissions and fuel economy standards.

Plan to Expand

German metrology developer Jenoptik is shifting “from focusing on metrology and laser processing standalone equipment to integrated automation solutions for the automotive industry and other new applications, including aerospace,” so it recently bought Prodomax Automation in Barrie, Ontario, and Five Lakes Automation, in Michigan, Prodomax Co-CEO Carolyn Garvey said.

Tool and Die Industry Challenged by Low Sourcing Levels

The Original Equipment Suppliers Association (OESA) and Harbour Results, Inc., (HRI) recently released the results of their Q2 2019 Automotive Tooling Barometer Survey. The results show that the tooling industry continues to slow, with North American capacity utilization at its lowest mark since 2016 when the metric first started being collected.