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Nesting Software Propels Part Programming Productivity

Smarter, faster nesting software programs with better automation and other major improvements are helping fabricators and metalcutters at job shops and other builders inject a jolt of productivity into their factory operations.

Improving 3D Scanning

While 3D scanning has already been adopted by many automotive part manufacturers, the use cases in Quality Control (QC) have been limited.

Dual-Spindle Technology a Boon to Automakers

Over its 140-year history, automotive manufacturing technology has evolved in parallel with progress in the vehicles themselves. Early automakers custom made individual “horseless carriages.” Later, standardized parts and moving assembly lines delivered mass-produced cars. Development of integrated transfer lines enabled part runs to extend for years.

How Bright is the Future of Automation?

In the 1955 short story “Autofac,” Philip K. Dick envisioned a world dominated by self-replicating robots that work incessantly, eventually depleting the planet’s resources.

How Machine Shops Can Benefit from New Automation Technology

As automation technology becomes more effective, cost effective, and easier to implement, job shops are automating more and more of their processes. In this episode, Alan Rooks, editor in chief of Manufacturing Engineering magazine, talks with Michael Gaunce, group manager, stationary workholding for Schunk Inc., about what a small to medium size job shop should consider when starting and exploration into automation; the particular machines or jobs that are easier to automate over others; why high part quantities are not needed in order to automate a job; what types of skills a shop should look for in employees working with automation; and how to define categories for the different styles of automation used in machine tool tending.

Deburring in Forming and Fabricating: Part 1

Deburring can sometimes be overlooked in production planning, but it is a critical part of forming and fabricating processes. In this podcast, part one of two, Alan Rooks, Editor in Chief of Manufacturing Engineering magazine, talks with Dr. LaRoux Gillespie, a researcher, engineer, manager, consultant, and writer with an extensive knowledge base on deburring and finishing gained from decades of both hands-on manufacturing and academic work. Dr. Gillespie is also a past president of SME. In this episode, the discussion focuses on key issues that create burrs in casting/forging/ molding, blanking and bending operations, and the basics of deburring in three key areas: burr properties, acceptable deburring, and cost effective deburring.

Flexible Automation for Automotive

As the automotive industry’s reawakening continues, less-expensive high-payload robots are gaining traction over more conventional fixed tooling among automakers focused on cutting costs while improving manufacturing productivity and processes.

Tools to Reduce Time and Money

Time is money and reliability is what a company’s reputation is built on. Chris Mahar, Associate Editor of Manufacturing Engineering, speaks with Mike Marr, Applications Technician at Hoffmann Group USA, about their Parabolic Performance Cutting (PPC) series and Garant Master Tap line. Discussing how manufacturers can reduce costs, provide process reliability and reduce machining times in both machining threads and 5-axis copy milling.

Going Beyond Chip Making: Saving Time

Every manufacturer aims for faster, better parts. While chip making time is often the focus when it comes to time savings, Chris Mahar, Associate Editor of Manufacturing Engineering, talks with Steven Baier, Vice President of Sales for Haimer USA, about time savings that go beyond cutting time.

Masters of Manufacturing: M. Eugene Merchant

M. Eugene Merchant began his career in 1936 at the Cincinnati Milling Machine Co. (later Cincinnati Milacron), where he went to work analyzing the nature of friction between the cutting tool and the chip. The young engineer eventually developed a mathematical model of the metalcutting process that is still taught and used today.