Skip to content
SME Search Search Results

Displaying 1-10 of 245 results for

Search Filters: 2019 or earlier clear Additive Manufacturing & 3D Printing clear Product Design & Engineering clear Stamping clear Forming & Fabricating clear Stamping clear Forming & Fabricating clear Plant Engineering & Maintenance clear Software clear

AM Producers Seek Solutions to Production Barriers

Additive manufacturing holds potential for many possible new frontiers in the aerospace industry, and manufacturers in aviation and space flight are reaching for those new vistas. But they’re held back at less than warp speed due to a lack of awareness, unmet technological needs and the absence of a formal regulatory process in their highly regulated industry.

Test and Measurement Gear Evolves to Measure AM Parts

Additive manufacturing (AM), or 3D printing, is a fast-growing field that offers many advantages over traditional techniques. It can create more complex parts than either machining or casting, can fuse different materials together, and is sometimes less expensive in low-volume or prototype applications.

Who Controls Feedstock Used in 3D Printers?

Should the US Copyright Office oversee whether 3D printer operators can use feedstock not approved by their machine’s maker to turn out medical devices or airplane parts, or is that the role of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), respectively?

A 4-part plan to help prepare for an eventual cyber breach

In a recent LNS Research study on the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and Digital Transformation, the top two challenges facing the adoption of IIoT technology are finding the budget to invest (32% of respondents) and building the business case (30% of respondents).

Stratasys CEO Departs Amid Losses

Stratasys Ltd (Minneapolis and Rehovot, Israel), the 3D printing company, said Tuesday its CEO is leaving, with no permanent replacement named and amid financial losses.

Structured Vision in Manufacturing

Structured light systems measure surfaces by projecting a pattern of fringes, then using cameras and sophisticated software to convert them into point clouds of metrology data. Accuracy can reach the single-digit microns over millions of points.