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Seco Opens Doors to Media for Niagara Cutter

Since acquiring Niagara Cutter in 2010, Seco has invested $7 million to upgrade Niagara Cutter’s manufacturing plant and equipment in Reynoldsville, PA, with another $25 million slated to be invested over the next three years.

There is No Hold on Innovation in Workholding

When it comes to creative workholding solutions, Kurt Industrial Products Division doesn’t hesitate to replace one or even two of its old vises with a new one to get a better product.

Methods to Show Automation Cell

On May 9 -11 2017, at the RAPID + tct Show Methods Machine Tools Inc., a leading supplier of precision machine tools, 3D printing technology and automation, will be showcasing a revolutionary cell solution designed to make quantum leap production increases in 3D manufacturing throughput.

Additive Grows and Has Growing Pains

Additive manufacturing is both growing and coping with growing pains. Companies “have to find ways to streamline” polishing and other finishing processes of 3D printed parts, industry consultant Terry Wohlers said today during a speech at RAPID + TCT.

United Grinding to Consolidate North American Operations in Miamisburg, OH

United Grinding North America will close its Fredericksburg, VA, office on July 1 and move those operations to its headquarters in Miamisburg, OH. “This tactical move is part of an overall strategy designed with the customer at the forefront,” said Theodore Neckel, director of corporate marketing for United Grinding North America.

Milling vs. Grinding for Rapid Stock Removal

A recent effort by the Norton Advanced Applications Engineering Group demonstrates that for difficult-to-machine materials, grinding can be an economical alternative to other machining processes.

New 3D Printer Makes Fully Isotropic Parts, Virtually Eliminates Post-Processing

One of the “dirty secrets” of 3D printing is the universal need to take additional steps to render the output usable, including removing the part from its support, curing the part, or improving the surface. Aside from additional cycle time and cost, these steps often require or emit toxic chemicals, necessitating special ventilation and making them unsuitable for a standard office environment. For example, parts built with fused deposition modeling (FDM) must spend about four to eight hours in a heated, agitated sodium hydroxide bath.