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RTAM/SME Dick Aubin Distinguished Paper Award Recipients

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The Rapid Technologies & Additive Manufacturing Community is pleased to announce that the following professionals have been recognized for their contribution to the rapid technical community. The RTAM/SME Dick Aubin Distinguished Paper Award is presented annually at SME's RAPID Conference and Exposition. Winners are also featured on the RTAM/SME home page.

2012

Authors: E. Magalini,1 P. Robotti,1 S. Stubinger,2 B. Von Rechnberg,2 S. Ferguson,3 P. Buma,4 E. Biemond,4 and E. Preve,1 Eurocoating spa,1 University of Zürich,2 University Bern3 and Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center4

Paper Title: Biological Evidences of Benefits for Additive Manufactured Porous Titanium Foams

Abstract: This paper presents some of the results obtained by Eurocoating with the help of external research partners (i.e., universities) in years of research activities performed on two specific additive manufacturing technologies used with Ti-6Al-4V: electron beam melting (EBM) or direct metal laser sintering (DMLS). In particular, the mechanical characterization of Ti-6Al-4V obtained with two technologies and in comparison with a conventional manufacturing method (i.e., wrought and annealing) is presented. Furthermore, in-vivo characterization data for several engineered trabecular highly porous surfaces suitable for bone colonization are given.

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Emanuele Magalini (left), R&D manager, Eurocoating
spa, with David Leigh, 2012 chair, RTAM Community.
Magalini was presented with the 2012 RTAM/SME
Dick Aubin Distinguished
Paper Award at RAPID 2012,
May 22-25 in Atlanta.

2011

Authors: Jan T. Sehrt, Dr.-Ing., and Gerd Witt, Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil., University of Duisburg-Essen

Paper Title: Part Management by Direct Integration of RFID Tags into Beam Melted Parts

Abstract: Today’s trend of the market requires innovative thoughts and further development of additive manufacturing processes such as beam melting. Especially with regard to the increasing diversity of different product versions with decreasing batch sizes at the same time the additive manufacturing itself becomes more and more important. In general, the additive manufacturing differs from conventional technologies by its layer wise and additive joining together material to a physical part instead of removing material. Because the trend of beam melting moves from prototype production to rapid manufacturing (production of end products with series characteristics), the identification and management of beam-melted parts can be achieved by using RFID technology. In this paper, feasibility studies for producing smart parts by the direct integration of RFID tags into beam-melted parts underneath the surface are investigated. It can be demonstrated that signals from RFID tags can be transmitted through dense metal material. This individual labeling of beam-melted parts leads to new possibilities, especially with regard to the quality management for rapid manufacturing purposes.
 
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2010

Authors: Philip Kilburn,1 Ian Halliday2 and Jason Watson,3 3T RPD Ltd.1,2 and Nottingham University Hospital Trust3 

Paper Title: Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) – The Future of Custom-Made Cranioplasty Design and Manufacture

Abstract: Cranial bone defects following craniotomy (bone removal) arise due to trauma, tumor removal, or more commonly, decompression craniotomy. Custom-made cranial implants are often used to replace missing bone. The traditional method of using self-curing polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement molded by hand has been updated to new methods such as the use of cobalt chrome, heat-cured PMMA, and more recently, titanium (Ti) for its biocompatible performance. This paper investigates the manufacture of cranial plates using computer tomography (CT) data, 3-D CAD and direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) to reduce lead times for cranial bone implant manufacture and improve clinical outcome.
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2009

Authors: Frank Liou,1 PhD, and Mary Kinsella,2 PhD, Missouri University of Science and Technology1 and Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base2  

Paper Title: A Rapid Manufacturing Process for High Performance Precision Metal Parts

Abstract: High-performance metals, such as titanium alloys, nickel superalloys, tool steel, stainless steels, etc., can benefit from the hybrid manufacturing process described in this paper. Coupling the additive and the subtractive processes into a single workstation, the hybrid process can produce metal parts with accuracy. The surface quality of the final product is similar to the industrial milling capability. Therefore, the hybrid process is potentially a very competitive process for fabrication and repair of fully dense metallic parts with precision requirements. It will certainly impact the future rapid manufacturing industry. To achieve such a system, issues, including the understanding of the direct laser deposition process and the automated process planning of the hybrid manufacturing process, are presented.
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2008

Authors: Jayanthi Parthasarathy, Binil Starly and Shivakumar Raman, University of Oklahoma

Paper Title: Design of Patient Specific Porous Titanium Implants for Craniofacial Applications

Abstract:Cranioplasty surgical procedures that are performed to correct defects of the skull require reconstruction of both form and function. Custom implants have gained importance due to their better performance over their generic counterparts owing to their precise adaptation to the region of implantation and reduction of surgical time and better cosmesis. Recent introduction of electron beam melting (EBM) has opened a new horizon for the possibility of direct fabrication of patient specific titanium prosthesis from CT scan data. This paper will discuss the design strategy for the fabrication of craniofacial implants using EBM technology, taking into account mechanical, biological and manufacturing constraints. Finite element analysis has been used to predict the effective mechanical properties of the porous structures.
 
 
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2006

Authors: G.E. Knoppers, J. Dijkstra and W.P. van Vliet, TNO Science and Industry

Paper Title: The Design of Graded Material Objects

Abstract: Rapid manufacturing utilizes the application of different materials in parts by stacking a sequence of layers. Based on the requirements of the part, mixtures of materials, so-called functionally graded materials, can be used to compose the product functionality. This process depends completely on the availability of CAD information of the part geometry. Unfortunately, commercially available CAD systems do not allow the design of graded material structures. TNO developed a computer tool that enables the user to specify functionally graded materials. The system is based on a new approach to define the material composition at any point in the solid. 
 
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2005
   

Authors: Paul Jacobs, PhD, and Thomas J. Mueller, Express Pattern Inc.

Paper Title: Are QuickCast Patterns Suitable for Limited Production?

Abstract: The QuickCast build style was first developed by 3D Systems in June 1992. The goal was to use stereolithography (SL) to rapidly fabricate a resin pattern suitable for use in the investment casting process, but which did NOT require fabrication of wax pattern tooling. The SL QuickCast pattern would then be used directly in the investment casting process, yielding a metal prototype. If the process was successful, end users could quickly proceed from a concept to a CAD model to a functional metal prototype, eliminating the time-consuming and expensive step of building wax pattern tooling.
 
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2004

Authors: Ryan Wicker, PhD;1 Atul Ranade;1 Francisco Medina;2 and Jeremy Palmer,3 University of Texas at Austin,1 W.M. Keck Border Biomedical Manufacturing and Engineering2 and Sandia National Laboratories3

Paper Title: Practical Considerations for Micro-Stereolithography of Embedded Micro-Channels

Abstract: In an effort to directly manufacture unique microfluidic devices with embedded complex and three-dimensional microchannels on the order of several microns to millimeters, issues associated with microfabrication using current commercially available stereolithography technology were investigated. Practical issues associated with the successful fabrication of embedded microchannels were divided into part preparation, part manufacture and post-cleaning with emphasis on channel geometry, size, number and orientation for successful microfabrication. Build issues investigated included accurate spatial registration of the build platform, building without base support and Z-stage position accuracy during the build.
 
 
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2003

Authors: Peter Regenfuss, Lars Hartwig, Sascha Klötzer, Robby Ebert and Horst Exner, University of Applied Sciences Mittweida

Paper Title: Microparts by a Novel Modification of Selective Laser Sintering

Abstract: Microparts with a structural resolution of <30 µm and aspect ratios of >10 have been generated by selective laser sintering. The technique includes sintering under conditions of vacuum or reduced shield gas pressure. A novel setup and raking procedure is employed. The material is processed by a 1,064 nm Nd-YAG laser. The procedure allows the workpieces to be generated from powders of high melting metals like tungsten as well as lower melting metals such as aluminum and copper. Contingent on the parameters, the generated bodies are either firmly attached to the substrate or can be dissevered by a nondestructive method.
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